Frequent question: Is Namaste Japanese or Indian?

Namaste is a common spoken valediction or salutation originating from the Hindus and Buddhists in the Indian Subcontinent and also in Japan. It is a customary greeting when individuals meet, and a valediction upon their parting.

What country is namaste from?

Namaste comes from Sanskrit, and literally means “I bow to you,” said with the accompanying pose at both greeting and parting. Forms of the word and depictions of the pose can be found in ancient Indian art and literature.

What is called namaste in Japanese?

Use konnichiwa (こんにちは) to greet most people in most settings. Konnichiwa (koh-nee-chee-wah) is the most common way to say “hello” in Japanese, and is considered an all-purpose greeting. You can use it during the day when greeting anyone, regardless of their social status.

Do Indians greet with namaste?

In many parts of India and during formal occasions, it is common for people to greet with the traditional Hindu greeting of “Namaste” (‘I greet the divine within you‘). This is accompanied with a nod of the head or a bow depending on the status of the person you are greeting.

Is it OK to say namaste?

Today, among Hindi speakers throughout the world, namaste is a simple greeting to say hello. It’s often used in more formal situations, like when addressing someone older or someone you don’t know well. But that’s all it means — hello.

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What is the response to namaste?

Correct response to Namaste is saying back Namaste to the other person. It’s a Hindi word for saying “ Hello” or greeting some person older than you.

What’s Moshi Moshi mean?

“Moshi Moshi” as “Hello

You’ve likely heard moshi moshi before, the expression used by Japanese people when they pick up the phone. The word moshi is derived from the verb “to say” in humble Japanese: ( 申 もう す).

Do Japanese people use Namaste?

Namaste is a common spoken valediction or salutation originating from the Hindus and Buddhists in the Indian Subcontinent and also in Japan. It is a customary greeting when individuals meet, and a valediction upon their parting.

Why do Indians touch feet?

Touching the feet of elders to seek their blessings is one of the nicer traditions in Hinduism. Some other communities practice it too, though to a lesser extent. Of course, you rarely touch the feet, it’s more the movement of bending-bowing to show your respect. It is more prevalent in northern and central India.

Do you shake hands in India?

Greetings vary between religions: for Hindus, say “namaste,” for Muslims, say “salaam alaykum,” and for Sikhs say “Sat sri akal.” Shaking hands is not the greeting custom in India. … It is best to stand an arm’s length or more away from the person you are speaking to, as the Indian people value their personal space.