Question: What two arguments supported the Indian Removal Act?

What were the arguments for the Indian Removal Act?

They felt that building factories, expanding farming, and constructing new roads and railroads would be a better use of the land. These people also believed that the white ways of living were superior to the Native American ways of living. Other people felt it was wrong to remove the Native Americans.

What are two causes of the Indian Removal Act?

However, more immediate reasons did cause Congress to pass the Indian Removal Act of 1830 during Jackson’s presidency. The factors contributing to the fate of the Cherokees were the discovery of gold on Cherokee land, the issue of states’ rights, and the emergence of scientific racism.

Who supported and opposed the Indian Removal Act?

President Andrew Jackson signed the measure into law on May 28, 1830. 3. The legendary frontiersman and Tennessee congressman Davy Crockett opposed the Indian Removal Act, declaring that his decision would “not make me ashamed in the Day of Judgment.”

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What were the main arguments for the removal of the Cherokee people?

The removal of the Cherokees was a product of the demand for arable land during the rampant growth of cotton agriculture in the Southeast, the discovery of gold on Cherokee land, and the racial prejudice that many white southerners harbored toward American Indians.

How long did the Indian Removal Act last?

Milestones: 1830–1860.

Why was the Indian Removal Act of 1830 unconstitutional?

Members of Congress like Davy Crockett argued that Jackson violated the Constitution by refusing to enforce treaties that guaranteed Indian land rights. But Congress passed the removal law in the spring of 1830. … In 1830, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Worcester v. Georgia that Jackson was wrong.

What did Andrew Jackson say about the Indian Removal Act?

Jackson declared that removal would “incalculably strengthen the southwestern frontier.” Clearing Alabama and Mississippi of their Indian populations, he said, would “enable those states to advance rapidly in population, wealth, and power.”

What were the long term effects of the Indian Removal Act?

What were the long term effects of the Indian Removal Act? It is estimated that the five tribes lost 1 in 4 of their population to cholera, starvation, cold and exhaustion during the move west.

How did the Cherokee respond to the Indian Removal Act?

From 1817 to 1827, the Cherokees effectively resisted ceding their full territory by creating a new form of tribal government based on the United States government. In response, the Cherokees took legal action to try to save their lands. …

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How did the Supreme Court interpret the Indian Removal Act?

How did the Supreme Court interpret the Indian Removal Act? Tribes could choose to remain on their lands. Tribes had no right to any land in the new territories. Tribes had to abide by the decisions of the United States.