What justification does Jackson cite for the government policy toward removal of Indian tribes from their traditional lands?

Jackson believed, “It [speedy removal] will place a dense and civilized population in large tracts of country now occupied by a few savage hunters.” Desires to remove American Indians from valuable farmland motivated state and federal governments to cease trying to assimilate Indians and instead plan for forced removal …

What was Jackson’s justification for passing the Indian Removal Act of 1830?

To achieve his purpose, Jackson encouraged Congress to adopt the Removal Act of 1830. The Act established a process whereby the President could grant land west of the Mississippi River to Indian tribes that agreed to give up their homelands.

What was the justification for Indian removal?

Jackson offered his own justification for Indian removal in December 1829, claiming that the removal was necessary for the preservation of American Indians – essentially asserting that removal was a humanitarian act for the good of the Indian tribes.

Why did Jackson want to remove the natives?

According to Jackson, moving the Indians would separate them from immediate contact with settlements of whites, free them from the power of the States, enable them to pursue happiness in their own way, and would stop their slow extinction.

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What was one effect of the Indian Removal Act of 1830?

Explanation: The Indian Removal Act of 1830 was signed into effect by President Jackson, which allowed Native Americans to settle in land within state borders in exchange for unsettled land west of the Mississippi. Many Native American tribes reacted peacefully, but many reacted violently.

What were the causes and effects of Indian removal policies during the 1830s?

Eventually, president Andrew Jackson, decided to pass the Indian removal acts in 1830, which allowed him to move the Indians west. … Effect: One major effect is that the Native American population severely decreased. While on the Trail of Tears, many Native Americans endured hypothermia, starvation, and sickness.

What were some economic effects of the Indian Removal Act?

Answer and Explanation: Some of the economic effects of the Indian Removal Act of 1830 were the bolstering of the US economy due to high profits from cotton, and detrimental economic effects for Native Americans who were relegated to reservations.

How did the Indian Removal Act violate the Constitution?

Jackson warned the tribes that if they failed to move, they would lose their independence and fall under state laws. Jackson backed an Indian removal bill in Congress. Members of Congress like Davy Crockett argued that Jackson violated the Constitution by refusing to enforce treaties that guaranteed Indian land rights.

What were the arguments against the Indian Removal Act?

The colonists did not consider that the land was their ancestral land and parts of it held significant cultural, social, and even religious symbolism for the natives. The natives were also being forced to build new settlements afresh, and the progress that they had made over the years was being undone.

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What were the long term effects of the Indian Removal Act?

What were the long term effects of the Indian Removal Act? It is estimated that the five tribes lost 1 in 4 of their population to cholera, starvation, cold and exhaustion during the move west.

What was Jackson’s message to Congress on Indian Removal?

Jackson declared that removal would “incalculably strengthen the southwestern frontier.” Clearing Alabama and Mississippi of their Indian populations, he said, would “enable those states to advance rapidly in population, wealth, and power.”