Does Hindu god promote multiple wives concept?

Does Hinduism allow multiple wives?

[1] Now, polygamy is outlawed, monogamy is the only option left for Hindus as bigamy is also not allowed. STATUTORY PROVISIONS OUTCASTING POLYGAMY IN INDIA. The abolition and criminalization of Hindu Polygamy was put straight forward when the Hindu Marriage Act came into force on 18th May, 1955.

Why do Hindu gods have multiple wives?

Mention of one, two or 16,000 wives for deities is plainly symbolic. Basically the wives represent an aspect of the consciousness. Not necessarily a simple portion as in case of Shiva and Shakthi, static principle and dynamic principle…the silent Purusha upholding the multitudinous action of Prakriti.

Which Indian god has many wives?

Number and names

Apart from his eight principal wives, Krishna is described to have married several thousand women, he rescued from the demon Narakasura.

Which religions allow multiple wives?

For example, in some Islamic, Hindu, and even Christian countries, polygamy is a normal practice or is otherwise tolerated. Some Native American, Indigenous Australian, and Mongolian peoples practice “group marriage,” where the nuclear family consists of multiple husbands and multiple wives.

Is it legal to have two wives?

United States. Polygamy is the act or condition of a person marrying another person while still being lawfully married to another spouse. It is illegal in the United States. The crime is punishable by a fine, imprisonment, or both, according to the law of the individual state and the circumstances of the offense.

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Which God has 2 wives?

Sanskrit scriptures generally regard only Devasena as the consort of Kartikeya, while in South India, he has two consorts, Devayanai (Devasena) and Valli. Devasena is described as daughter of the king of the gods, Indra and his wife Shachi or at least the adopted daughter of Indra.

Who is the last god in Hinduism?

Kalkin, also called Kalki, final avatar (incarnation) of the Hindu god Vishnu, who is yet to appear.