How did the Cherokees respond to the Indian Removal Act apex?

How did Cherokees respond to the Indian Removal Act Brainly?

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The Cherokees, in response, filed a lawsuit in court to justify thier beliefs that this was rightfully their land. Even though the Supreme Court ruled in their favor, Georgia governors removed them from their land anyways.

How did the Cherokee respond to removal?

Most of the Cherokee, including Chief John Ross, were outraged and unwilling to move, and they reacted with opposition. They did not believe the government would take any action against them if they elected to stay.

What did the Cherokee do about the Indian Removal Act?

The Cherokee took their case to the Supreme Court, which ruled against them. The Cherokee went to the Supreme Court again in 1831. This time they based their appeal on an 1830 Georgia law which prohibited whites from living on Indian territory after March 31, 1831, without a license from the state.

How did the Cherokee initially respond to the Indian Removal Act quizlet?

How did the Cherokee respond to the act? The Cherokee decided to take it to the courts and they ended up having a hearing at the Supreme Court. … He was a justice in the Supreme Court. He was apart of the Indian Removal Act case and favored the Indians.

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How did Cherokee chief John Ross respond to President Jackson?

How did Cherokee chief John Ross respond to President Jackson and the Indian Removal Act? He launched an attack against the US Army to stop American Indian removal. He appealed to state governors to help stop American Indian removal. … He negotiated a settlement with the president to stop American Indian removal.

What actions did the Cherokees take to avoid removal?

Cherokee attempts at resisting the removal by the United States included creating a formal Cherokee constitution, negotiating the Treat of 1819, and proceeding with legal action within the Supreme Court. These actions proved futile when Andrew Jackson was elected President and forcibly removed them for their land.

What legal rights did the Cherokee have?

The Cherokee constitution provided for a two-house legislature, called the General Council, a principal chief, and eight district courts. It also declared all Cherokee lands to be tribal property, which only the General Council could give up.

Why was the Cherokee forced to move?

The removal of the Cherokees was a product of the demand for arable land during the rampant growth of cotton agriculture in the Southeast, the discovery of gold on Cherokee land, and the racial prejudice that many white southerners harbored toward American Indians.

What was the main purpose of the Indian Removal Act of 1830?

To achieve his purpose, Jackson encouraged Congress to adopt the Removal Act of 1830. The Act established a process whereby the President could grant land west of the Mississippi River to Indian tribes that agreed to give up their homelands.

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What were the arguments against the Indian Removal Act?

The colonists did not consider that the land was their ancestral land and parts of it held significant cultural, social, and even religious symbolism for the natives. The natives were also being forced to build new settlements afresh, and the progress that they had made over the years was being undone.