Who passed the Indian Act?

The act was passed by the Parliament of Canada under the provisions of Section 91(24) of the Constitution Act, 1867, which provides Canada’s federal government exclusive authority to govern in relation to “Indians and Lands Reserved for Indians”.

Why is the Indian Act bad?

The oppression of First Nations women under the Indian Act resulted in long-term poverty, marginalization and violence, which they are still trying to overcome today. Inuit and Métis women were also oppressed and discriminated against, and prevented from: serving in the Canadian armed forces.

How can you lose Indian Status?

Before Bill C-31, there were several ways a person could lose their Indian status as defined by the Indian Act . If a registered Indian woman married a non-Indian man, she automatically lost her Indian status. She and her children born after the marriage were no longer considered status Indians under the Indian Act .

How is the Indian Act maintained?

Only those on the official Indian Register maintained by the federal government (or a local “band list” in some cases) are Status Indians, subject to the full legal benefits and restrictions of the Act. … Various amendments and court decisions have repeatedly altered the rules regarding who is eligible for Indian Status.

What was the main purpose of the Indian Act?

The Indian Act was created in 1876. The main goal of the Act was to force the First Nations peoples to lose their culture and become like Euro-Canadians. The Indian Act has been changed many times. It does not affect either the Métis or Inuit.

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How much land do natives own in Canada?

Indians have ample reserve lands

Canada is a vast country (9.985 million sq km) but just 0.2 per cent of its total land mass is reserve land. That 0.2 per cent of Canada’s land mass is home 339,595 Indigenous people (2016 Census), or 0.2% of the land mass houses 20% of the Indigenous population.

How did the Indian Act affect residential schools?

In 1920, the Act was amended to combat low attendance by making it compulsory for status Indian children to attend residential schools, with consequences to those who hid their children. … Parents or guardians who tried to hide the children were liable to be arrested and or imprisoned.