Why was the Indian Act redrafted?

The Indian Act is a part of a long history of assimilation policies that intended to terminate the cultural, social, economic, and political distinctiveness of Aboriginal peoples by absorbing them into mainstream Canadian life and values.

Why is the Indian Act still problematic?

The oppression of First Nations women under the Indian Act resulted in long-term poverty, marginalization and violence, which they are still trying to overcome today. Inuit and Métis women were also oppressed and discriminated against, and prevented from: serving in the Canadian armed forces.

Why was the Indian Act originally created?

The Indian Act was created to assimilate Indigenous peoples into mainstream society and contained policies intended to terminate the cultural, social, economic, and political distinctiveness of Indigenous peoples.

What was the purpose and main objective of the Indian Act?

The Indian Act was created in 1876. The main goal of the Act was to force the First Nations peoples to lose their culture and become like Euro-Canadians. The Indian Act has been changed many times. It does not affect either the Métis or Inuit.

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When was the Indian Act terminated?

In 1951, a complete redrafting of the Indian Act was undertaken, the 1876 Act fully repealed and replaced by a statute thoroughly modernized by the standards of the day. A principal change was to give structure to band governance.

Who benefits from the Indian Act?

Registered Indians, also known as status Indians, have certain rights and benefits not available to non-status Indians, Métis, Inuit or other Canadians. These rights and benefits include on-reserve housing, education and exemptions from federal, provincial and territorial taxes in specific situations.

Do natives get free money in Canada?

Aboriginal students get free post-secondary education. Some do, some don’t. The federal government provides money to First Nations and Inuit communities to pay for tuition, travel costs and living expenses. … Non-status Indians and Metis students are excluded.

Is the Indian Act good or bad?

The Indian Act imposed great personal and cultural tragedy on First Nations, many of which continue to affect communities, families and individuals today.

What do you really know about the Indian Act?

The Indian Act is the primary legislation used to govern First Nations people for the last 140 years. The Indian Act has been a lightning rod for criticism and controversy over the years, widely attacked by First Nations people and communities for its regressive and paternalistic excesses.

What is the Indian Act today?

Since Canada was created in 1867, the federal government has been in charge of aboriginal affairs. The Indian Act, which was enacted in 1876 and has since been amended, allows the government to control most aspects of aboriginal life: Indian status, land, resources, wills, education, band administration and so on.

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Can Indian status be revoked?

It is now impossible for a status Indian to lose their status, and those who had involuntarily lost their status were able to be reinstated with it. These amendments, however, have not entirely remedied the discriminatory history, as descendents of women who have lost their status continue to face challenges.

How did the Indian Act affect residential schools?

In 1920, the Act was amended to combat low attendance by making it compulsory for status Indian children to attend residential schools, with consequences to those who hid their children. … Parents or guardians who tried to hide the children were liable to be arrested and or imprisoned.