How do you diss Indians?

How can I offend an Indian person?

15 Classic Ways To Offend An Indian

  1. 1. ” Who is Sachin Tendulkar?”
  2. 2. ” So you worship cows? …
  3. 3. ” What’s that red dot on your head?” …
  4. 4. ” So you are a Hindi? …
  5. 5. ” Can you teach me Tantrik Yoga?”
  6. 6. ” It’s basi cally just like Slumdog Millionaire , right?”
  7. 7. ” You’re 35, and you still stay with your mother?” …
  8. 8. “

How do you annoy an Indian?

So here are 12 surefire ways to piss off an Indian.

  1. Praise Pakistan during an India/Pak cricket match. …
  2. Stepping on a book/paper. …
  3. Comparing Mumbai with Slumdog Millionaire. …
  4. Not removing shoes before entering a house. …
  5. Claiming that Indian women are less beautiful. …
  6. Talk bad about Bollywood. …
  7. Praising the Indian Government.

What should you never say to an Indian?

11 Things You Should Never Say In India

  • “Wow! …
  • “You’ll have an arranged marriage, won’t you?”
  • “Do you worship cows?”
  • “You don’t really look Indian, it’s like you’re too pretty to be Indian.”
  • “I’m not a cricket fanatic.”
  • “Are you sure, as a woman, you want to travel alone in India?”
  • “I love your accent.”

What is offensive to Indian culture?

Feet and shoes are considered dirty. Do not step over a person sitting or lying on the floor, as it is offensive. Never touch anything with your feet, and don’t point the bottom of your feet at religious altars or toward people. To avoid this, sit cross-legged or kneel on the floor while in a temple or holy place.

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What do you call a person from India?

“Indian.” On its own, “Indian” refers to people from India, so you wouldn’t use it to describe an Indigenous person. “Natives.” Someone might say, “I’m Native,” dropping the “American,” but white oppressors have traditionally used the plural “natives” in negative and dismissive ways.

What is considered most respectful in Indian culture?

Meeting and Greeting

Westerners may shake hands, however, greeting with ‘namaste’ (na-mas-TAY) (placing both hands together with a slight bow) is appreciated and shows respect for Indian customs. Men shake hands with men when meeting or leaving. Men do not touch women when meeting or greeting.