Quick Answer: How did Andrew Jackson justify the Indian Removal Act?

Jackson declared that removal would “incalculably strengthen the southwestern frontier.” Clearing Alabama and Mississippi of their Indian populations, he said, would “enable those states to advance rapidly in population, wealth, and power.”

Why did Jackson want the Indian Removal Act?

President Jackson told Congress that he felt the act was fair because a fair exchange of land was being granted and because the General Government proposed to pay the whole expense of the red man’s removal and settlement…

Did Andrew Jackson believe in Indian Removal?

Jackson viewed the union as a federation of highly esteemed states, as was common before the American Civil War. He opposed Washington’s policy of establishing treaties with Indian tribes as if they were foreign nations.

How long did the Indian Removal Act last?

Milestones: 1830–1860.

Did the Indian Removal Act violate the Constitution?

In 1828, Jackson was elected president. … Jackson backed an Indian removal bill in Congress. Members of Congress like Davy Crockett argued that Jackson violated the Constitution by refusing to enforce treaties that guaranteed Indian land rights. But Congress passed the removal law in the spring of 1830.

What were the arguments against the Indian Removal Act?

The colonists did not consider that the land was their ancestral land and parts of it held significant cultural, social, and even religious symbolism for the natives. The natives were also being forced to build new settlements afresh, and the progress that they had made over the years was being undone.

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Why is the Indian Removal Act important?

It gave the president power to negotiate removal treaties with Indian tribes living east of the Mississippi. Under these treaties, the Indians were to give up their lands east of the Mississippi in exchange for lands to the west. Those wishing to remain in the east would become citizens of their home state.