Quick Answer: How did the Cherokee react to the Indian Removal Act?

From 1817 to 1827, the Cherokees effectively resisted ceding their full territory by creating a new form of tribal government based on the United States government. … In response, the Cherokees took legal action to try to save their lands.

How did the Cherokee initially respond to the Indian Removal Act quizlet?

How did the Cherokee respond to the act? The Cherokee decided to take it to the courts and they ended up having a hearing at the Supreme Court. … He was a justice in the Supreme Court. He was apart of the Indian Removal Act case and favored the Indians.

Did the Cherokee support the Indian Removal Act?

Division Among the Cherokees

John Ross, the principal chief of the Cherokees, led the tribal government and majority of Cherokees opposed to removal.

What was one result of the passage of the Indian Removal Act of 1830?

Introduction. The Indian Removal Act was signed into law by President Andrew Jackson on May 28, 1830, authorizing the president to grant lands west of the Mississippi in exchange for Indian lands within existing state borders. A few tribes went peacefully, but many resisted the relocation policy.

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How did the Cherokee try to avoid removal?

The Cherokee generally attempted to resist removal by the United States through negotiations and legal proceedings. In 1825, the Cherokee established a capital in Georgia, created a written constitution, and declared themselves a sovereign nation.

What were the arguments against the Indian Removal Act?

The colonists did not consider that the land was their ancestral land and parts of it held significant cultural, social, and even religious symbolism for the natives. The natives were also being forced to build new settlements afresh, and the progress that they had made over the years was being undone.

How long did the Indian Removal Act last?

Milestones: 1830–1860.

Who benefited from the Indian Removal Act?

Most white Americans supported the Removal Act, especially southerners who were eager to expand southward. Expansion south would be good for the country and the future of the country’s economy with the later introduction of cotton production in the south.

How did the Indian Removal Act Impact America?

While this law enabled the United States to expand their territory and allow U.S. citizens to move further West, this movement of forced relocation angered many Indian tribes who would sometimes resist American forces. … This document seemed to influence most Americans to allow the government to relocate these natives.

Why is the Indian Removal Act important?

It gave the president power to negotiate removal treaties with Indian tribes living east of the Mississippi. Under these treaties, the Indians were to give up their lands east of the Mississippi in exchange for lands to the west. Those wishing to remain in the east would become citizens of their home state.

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What were some economic effects of the Indian Removal Act?

Answer and Explanation: Some of the economic effects of the Indian Removal Act of 1830 were the bolstering of the US economy due to high profits from cotton, and detrimental economic effects for Native Americans who were relegated to reservations.