Why did the British grow the indigo plant in India?

Answer : The indigo plant grows primarily in the tropics and this was the primary reason for the British to turn to India for the growth of the indigo plant. The demand for Indian indigo grew, as European cloth manufacturers wanted only Indian Indigo as it produced a rich blue colour. …

Why did British grow indigo in India?

The British forced Indian farmers to grow indigo because growing indigo had become profitable in backdrop of its high demand in Europe.

Why did the British cultivated indigo?

Answer: Explanation: Britain needed indigo because it produced a rich blue after dyeing the clothes. … Britain wanted a new market to cultivate indigo to fullfill its demand in britain so it started cultivation in Indai, as indian climatic conditions were favourable for indigo cultivation.

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What was the reason for demand of Indian indigo?

⭕ Indian Indigo is in high demand because it was manufactured by the plants which is cheaper in cost and easily foundable. its cost is very low as compare to dye which was imported from foreign. The gestures of indian indigo is good as well shining easily moldable to any design.

What was the reason for the growing importance of Indian indigo in Europe?

Answer:At that time indigo was less expensive for the Europeans and it was used for various purposes. 3) By the thirteenth century, Indian indigo was being used by the cloth manufacturers in Italy, France and Britain to dye cloth.

Is indigo still used today?

Indigo dye has been used for thousands of years by civilizations all over the world to dye fabric blue. It has been the most famous and most widely used natural dye throughout history and is still extremely popular today as evidenced by the familiar colour of blue jeans.

What is the last stage of indigo production?

Gradually the indigo separated out in flakes, a muddy sediment settled at the bottom of the vat and a clear liquid rose to the surface. (v) This liquid was drained off and the sediment, i.e. indigo pulp transferred to another vat, also known as the settling vat, and then pressed and dried for sale.

What did British need indigo?

Answer Expert Verified. Britain needed indigo because it produced a rich blue after dyeing the clothes. … Britain wanted a new market to cultivate indigo to fullfill its demand in britain so it started cultivation in Indai, as indian climatic conditions were favourable for indigo cultivation.

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Why was indigo cultivated?

How was indigo cultivated? There were two main systems of indigo cultivation – nij and ryoti. Within the system of nij cultivation, the planter produced indigo in lands that he directly controlled. He either bought the land or rented it from other zamindars and produced indigo by directly employing hired labourers.

Why did the demand for Indian indigo increase by the end of 18th century?

The demand for indigo increased in the late-eighteenth-century Britain because of the expansion of cotton production as a result of industrialisation, which in turn created an enormous demand for cloth dyes.

Why was there a demand for Indian indigo Class 8?

Class 8 Question

The demand for indigo increase because the production of indigo sttoped in british country by indigo cultivation land become barren so they make pressure to grow indigo in india.

Why was indigo popular in Europe?

Only small amounts of indigo reached in the European market and its prices were very high. European cloth manufacturers therefore had to depend on another plant called woad to make violet and blue dyes. … So, there was a great demand for Indian indigo in the European countries.

Why was there a popular demand for Indian indigo in Italy France and Britain?

The demand for Indian indigo grew, as European cloth manufacturers wanted only Indian Indigo as it produced a rich blue colour. Due to this demand the price of Indian indigo rose in the European market and mediated the British to grow more indigo in the Indian soil.

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Why was woad not in demand like Indian indigo in the European market?

The European plant called woad also produces a violet and blue dye, so European producers of woad pressurised their governments to ban the import of Indian indigo so they can sell woad without competition. But the colour from woad was not as rich as that from the Indian indigo, and woad also gave out a terrible smell.

Why was Indian indigo in demand in European markets in 18th century?

During 18th century, in Europe planters only produced woad. It produced a pale blue colour. … So it was much popular as compared to woad. Thus, there was an great demand of indian indigo in european market in the 18th century.